Category Archives: Resources

My Top Video Gear for Road Trips and Travel

(Side note: The above photo is just a stock photo, not my actual gear. I thought it looked nice.  But who puts a potted plant in their lineup???)

Many times when people watch my travel videos, they ask “what’d you shoot that on?” or “you must have brought a lot of gear on that trip!”  And what I’ve realized is that many people think gear is everything. They think having the top gear is how you make a great video.  I used to believe this too.  I’ve been guilty of saying “Well, if I had X camera, I could do that too.”  But the truth is I couldn’t.  Good story and execution is what makes a video great.  Everything else are just tools (although I fully admit great gear can elevate your work).  Once I learned this, I stopped focusing so much on having the best gear.  I still buy stuff and I still plan on upgrading from time to time, but the gear I don’t have never stops me from trying to make great videos.

But, when people are just starting out and getting into video as a hobby, sometimes they don’t even know what’s what.  “What do I even need?”  It helps to peek into someone else’s bag and get an idea.  So that’s why I’m making this list.  This is the gear I use to make my videos.  It’s in no way the best, the only way, or even comprehensive, but I hope it serves as a good starting point.

Bag – Almost all my gear can fit in this bag.  It’s great knowing that it’s all in one place. Plenty of space for a few lenses, the front opens for easy access, and there are compartments for batteries, cables, and random things you want to throw in there.

Lowepro Fastpack 250 DSLR Camera Backpack

Day Bag – When you don’t need your full-size backpack and all of the accessories, this one is much easier to take on a hike or go to the beach.  I actually started with this one and bought the bigger 250 once my gear grew.

Lowepro Fastpack 100

Camera – I have the Canon 60d.  It’s old now.  It doesn’t shoot in 4k or capture slow motion footage.  But it’s still capable of shooting great looking video and photos that I’m happy with.  Until I make some serious extra cash, it’s not going anywhere.

Canon 60d

Lens – My Canon 17-55mm lens gives me variety to shoot things both close and far away, portrait style and wide.   I use this lens the most.

Canon EF-S 17-55mm

Wide lens – When I’m shooting landscapes and I really want to show the vastness, I’ll pop on this lens.

Tokina 11-16mm

Circular Polarizer – Improves color and contrast while reducing glare. Really helpful on bright days.  Kinda like sunglasses!

Tiffen Circular Polarizer

Microphone – The microphone on most DSLR cameras is pretty lousy.  I like this one because it’s small, produces good sound, and mounts directly on top of the camera.

Rode VMGO Video Mic GO

GoPro – When I’m going in the water or want to try something creative/risky with the camera, I’ll pull out my GoPro.  I like the accessibility it provides.  You can get shots you normally wouldn’t be able to.

GoPro Hero 4 Black (Previous model)

Cell Phone Battery Packs – If you film with your phone, you’ll want the extra juice to last you through the day.

Anker PowerCore+ mini

External Hard Drive – Having an external hard drive to store all this footage is key.  I like the rugged drives because of their durability.  That’s important when moving around all the time.  A little pricey, but good.

LaCie Rugged Thunderbolt and USB 3.0 2 TB

Phone Tripod – I’ll shoot time lapses or just set up an establishing shot with my phone.  Being able to place it exactly how I want is key.

Tripod or Bendy Tripod – Useful for your big camera too.  Great for night-lapse, long exposure photography, or interesting angles.

MacBook Pro – This is what I have, but there are plenty of great Windows options for editing too.



Let me know if you have any questions.  I hope this short list was helpful for anyone interested in video and photography.




Road Trip Randy is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to

I’m Teaching On Udemy: How To Make Videos

Ever since I started making videos, I’ve gotten a lot of questions about how I do things.  How did you edit like that?   What should I do if I want to start making my own videos?  What kind of camera should I get?

I’ve also always wanted to create an online course.  There’s a small bit of entrepreneur in me.  I wasn’t sure what the topic would be though, because I felt like I had a lot of random skills and knowledge, but not enough in one area.  Then I remembered I have a film degree, work in Hollywood, and constantly make and edit my own videos.   I do know a few things!  So I sat down and wrote out a rough outline and realized I have enough material to create a nice course for beginners.

And that’s what I did. How To Make Videos: Learn Production Basics From Scratch is my video course for beginners.  If you’re interested in making videos for your own brand or just as a hobby and you have no background in it at all, you might enjoy this.  Check out the course description (about halfway down the page) and decide for yourself:

video production for beginners

I’ve even got a coupon code for readers of this blog.  If you purchase my course by the end of July you’ll get it for 50% off.  $10!

Use This Link To Get 50% Off


And if you don’t care about learning how to make videos, no worries. I’ll still post to this blog very regularly (currently that seems to be once every three months).

Thanks for reading!



The Ultimate Road Trip Planner Internet Resource Guide


The Ultimate Road Trip Planner Internet Resource Guide

Where are all the good road trip planning resources?!

Recently, I was trying to plan a road trip up north and I realized something strange. There weren’t many road trip resources online.  At least not many good ones.  Or ones that have been updated since 1996.  But I felt like something had to be out there.  So I scoured the web, asked around in forums, and tried to find the best road trip planning resources on the web.  After a more thorough search, there were actually quite a few that I would deem “good.” And not just websites, but there were also tools, apps, and people/brands contributing to the road trip and travel lifestyle.

Since I’m weird and can’t just put everything in a bookmark folder (the easy thing to do), I decided to take all the resources I found, and put them together into one neat, easy-to-read, organized list.

I call it:


Below, broken into categories, are the top resources online to help plan your ultimate road trip.  As new ones pop up, I’ll be sure to update this list.  If you know of other resources that provide readers with awesome road trip and travel content, feel free to suggest them in the comments below!

Let’s begin:

road trip planner

THE OBVIOUS: These are the big resources you should already know about.  But if you don’t, start using them now.  They’ll make your travel planning a whole lot easier.

  • Yelp – Crowd-sourced reviews for businesses and attractions.
  • Lonely Planet – Travel guides! Make sure to check out their Thorn Tree travel forum.
  • Expedia – Book hotels, flights, cars, and more.
  • Kayak – Book hotels, flights, cars, and more.
  • SkyScanner – Find the cheapest flight. Can also book hotels and cars.
  • AAA – Roadside assistance and travel services for its members.
  • ZipCar – Rent a car.  Able to pay by the hour.
  • Air BnB – Rent out a room, home, or apartment from local hosts.

road trip planner

WEBSITES: This next section is websites.  I tried to keep it to resources that have the best information on cool places to see, routes to take, and general road tripping tips.

Oh, and most of these resources are for U.S. road trips only.  Sorry, everyone else in the world.


Updated regularly, Roadtrippers features great places to visit from the strange to the beautiful.  They have a fantastic trip planner, but their articles also give readers thorough information and inspiration about the most scenic driving routes to the scariest ghost towns. Roadtrippers is king.


RoadTrip America is another good all around website.  Full of travel tips, routes, interactive maps, and forums, it has your bases covered for your road trip needs.


Although it looks like they haven’t updated their website since 1996, don’t be too quick to dismiss them. Roadside America also has some great content.  You’ll find some of the best offbeat attractions here.  I especially like how you can sort your search by state.


Another website that may be going for the pre-Y2k look. Planning Fun Road Trips offers tips, planners, and best ofs.  This site will get you up to speed quickly if you’re planning your first road trip.


If you have national parks in your road trip plans, you’ll want to remember this website.  The NPS has information on every national park in each state with the information you need from park fees and hours to maps and suggested itineraries.


Just what the title says- a fantastic page that links to all of the tourism websites for each US state and territory.  Pick a state and find things to do right away.


When you first open up Atlas Obscura, it’s evident that the people behind it like to explore and like to have a good time.  I like the fun, personal vibe of the website and I like that it’s easy to navigate.  What are you looking for? Ghost towns in California? Atlas Obscura will give you a list of places to visit, a map of where they are, and then a personal article about that location.  Whenever I visit the site I usually stumble across some pretty bizarre and cool places to check out.  Atlas Obscura is a new find I’m very excited about!


Are you looking for trip advice, trying to find a travel partner, or just itching to read a cool road trip story?  Reddit has got you covered. Here are some of my favorite subreddits for road trips and traveling.


road trip with stops

TOOLS: Here’s a list of the online tools that will help make your money-calculating and route-choosing worries go away.


Punch in your estimated or actual costs for rental prices, gas, hotels, and daily budget, and the road trip calculator will come up with your total.  It’s a simple way to see where most of your money is going and whether or not you can squeeze in another night of travel.


Discover America’s road trip planner is one of my favorites.  Not only does it allow you to plot a point from A to B, but it lets you add and subtract attractions that are on the route.  For example, if you’re taking a trip across the country, you can “turn on” museums and campgrounds and “turn off” shopping centers and airports.  You can even turn on Instagram photos so a person’s travel photos will pop up along your route.  Add any attraction to your itinerary straight from the map.  Discover America’s road trip planner is definitely worth trying out.


If you’re looking to road trip all 48 states in one go and you want the perfect route, look no further.  Randy (great name!) Olson created the most optimal and efficient route using an algorithm.  The trip makes stops in each state at a national park, historic site, or other interesting landmark.  Check out the link above to read more about the algorithm and chosen attractions.


There are some people who just want a basic, printable, easy-to-read trip planner.  Although rare in the age of smart phones with maps and travel apps, this is a basic route planning site that lets you choose a few route options (favoring scenic routes, avoiding tolls, estimating fuel costs, etc), press submit, and receive a bare-bones itinerary.  It’s old school, but if that’s your thing, take a look at this resource.

blogs for road trips

BLOGS: Of course this section will naturally be more subjective, I tried to choose blogs that not only inspired and entertained, but also provided some type of informational content.  

Here are some of my favorite blogs to check out:


California Through My Lens gives readers a taste of California through the eyes of Josh, a man “addicted to adventure.”  It’s incredible how many places this one guy has visited in California.  All of his guides and articles are full of detail and include fantastic pictures. If every state had someone as awesome as Josh road tripping and sharing cool places, the states wouldn’t need tourism websites!  If you’re heading to California, check out CaliforniaThroughMyLens.


Not exactly a “road tripper,” but I’d say he has enough travel under his belt to give you some awesome advice and travel inspiration.  Matt is what I would call a “travel hacker” – someone who finds the cheapest, easiest, and most efficient way travel.  He has a range of articles from Africa travel tips, to best gear, to how to save money for a big trip.  Nomadic Matt is another travel blogging king.


Instead of having a midlife crisis Rick and Sandi are on a midlife road trip.  They’re traveling the world, checking things off their bucket list, and driving around in a Weinermobile (well, not always. Unfortunately).  Adventurous, fun, and they don’t take themselves too seriously.  Their website is full of good information, but it’s definitely more on the entertainment side!


Wandering Earl is one of the most popular travel bloggers on the internet.  He set out on a three-month trip to Asia and hasn’t stopped traveling since.  He blogs about his adventures and struggles, offers tips and information, and even has his own resource books and tours. This guy is making a living off being a permanent nomad and there’s plenty to learn.


Brooke is another blogger who travels the world full time.  And although you may take one look and say “Oh no, just another pretty girl traveling the world,” she’s built a pretty impressive online presence.  Her website is full of quick tips, reviews, and travel stories. And she’s amassed hundreds of thousands of followers on her social media accounts.  Her content is geared more towards girls in their teens and twenties, but even if you don’t fit that demographic, you can still probably find something you relate to.


I like Liz.  No, I don’t actually know her.  But it looks like she hustles, and I respect that.  Her website is about her own adventures around the world.  She’s been doing it for years and her articles give her readers tips, advice, and personal anecdotes about travel.  So, no, not exactly road tripping, but I’m confident you’ll be inspired by her drive, her excellent writing style, her travel stories, her photographs, and her rad sense of adventure.

best apps for road trips

APPS: Remember when people used to use real, paper maps? No? Me neither.  I can’t imagine getting around without the map app in my phone. Although some of the apps built in the name of convenience are just plain ridiculous, some of the ones built in the name of travel are just plain awesome.  

Here are some of my favorite travel apps:

  • gas buddyGAS BUDDY – Find the cheapest gas station nearby.
  • iexitiEXIT – Tells you what’s at upcoming exits on your route.
  • troverTROVER – Instagram/Pinterest style photo-travel app.  Great for finding hidden gems in big cities or interesting places along the way.
  • roadtrippersROADTRIPPERS – Find cool places, plan trips, save itineraries.  Great interface and easy to use.
  • field tripFIELD TRIP – Be notified automatically when you get close to something cool.  Find food, drinks, historic spots, and unique attractions just by being nearby.
  • yonderYONDER – Choose an outdoor activity you’re interested in, choose your location, and find places where you can do that activity around you.  Connect with others and share tips and photos.
  • day oneDAY ONE – A nicely designed app for journaling.  Record the cool things you see or do on your road trip. Add pictures too.
  • road trip liteROAD TRIP LITE – Great app to track your car mileage and fuel economy.
  • yelpYELP – Find any type of restaurant, attraction, or even a mechanic based on category and location.  Read reviews and see pictures from other users.
  • tripitTRIPIT – Tripit take all your travel plans and confirmation emails (hotel and car reservations, for example) and creates a neat itinerary saved in one place.
  • RV ParkyRV PARKY – RV PARKS AND MORE – Find RV parks, campgrounds and more with the RV Parky app.  It also shows what amenities are at each site such as electricity, water, picnic tables, price, etc.
  • butuBUTU – Unfortunately the app hasn’t been updated in awhile (I almost didn’t put it on the list), but I like how you just tell it where you are and it will suggest where you should go and what you should see.
  • maps.meMAPS.ME – Offline maps.  Download the map of your destination, and then use it when you don’t have wifi or data access.
online road trippers


Do you like knowing where people are and what they’re doing every second of every day? Follow these people on Twitter then. Oh, and there are some brands that give good travel information on this list, too.
Mentioned in the sections above:
YouTube Travel Vloggers:


Fun Instagram accounts that deal with travel (in no particular order). Get inspired.  These photos are sweeeeeeeet!
  • philstockbridge
  • chrisburkard
  • jordanherschel
  • kev_alvarez
  • thesamgraves
  • californiathroughmylens
  • funforlouis
  • mrbenbrown
  • when_in_roams
  • worldwanderlust
  • abekislevitz
  • deeque_
  • jodyjohnston
  • mike_pgregory
  • talking_tree
  • matadornetwork
  • youngadventuress
miscellaneous road trip tips

MISCELLANEOUS: This section is for the resources that don’t really fit in the other categories.


Do you like watching those food travel shows? Want to visit those same restaurants?  TV Food Maps has put together a website that lists every restaurant organized by show.  You can also explore by state or location and create your own road trip!  A great resource for the serious foodie.


Just looking for good places to eat on the road?  Road Food helps you find great local restaurants nearby.  My favorite section is the Self-Guided Eating Tours.


And that’s it!

The Ultimate Road Trip Planner Internet Resource Guide.  As I mentioned above, I will continue to edit this list as I find more or better resources.

If you have any suggestions, let me know in the comments section below. If you already use some of these resources, I’d love to know which ones. If you hate any of these resources or just want to complain, also feel free to let me know in the comments section below.

Go trip yourself!

-Road Trip Randy

How to Land a Production Assistant Job in the Film Industry – Actionable Steps and Advice

Actionable Steps to Finding an Entry-Level Job in Hollywood’s Film and Television Industry

I take road trips when I can, but being a Production Assistant currently consumes most of my life. I wrote about what I do as a PA earlier.  Now I’d like to write about how I became one.


I’ve turned this article into an ebook on Amazon!   If you like what you read, please consider purchasing a copy.  Full disclosure: It’s very, very similar to what’s in this article (with a few bonus sections at the end). If you’re interested, check it out on Amazon, here:

How to Become a Production Assistant in Hollywood: Actionable Steps and Advice to Land the Job

Finding an entry-level position in Hollywood is harder than you think. But thanks to my struggles and stupid mistakes, I’ve learned a few things to help anyone get started on the right track.

Most blogs that talk about becoming a PA just tell you to “network!” and “be persistent!” And although those two things are important, those blogs usually fail to tell you how or even why.  I wanted to write something that went a little more in depth.  In order to start off on the right foot in Hollywood, you also have to learn how the industry works.  This post has nearly 5000 words, but I hope you find it just as useful and educational as it is long.

  • Students still in school.
  • Recent grads trying to break into the industry.
  • Any young person looking to switch careers and make it in Hollywood (but any age is possible).
  • Anyone who just wants to read how it all works.

Warner Brothers Studio Tour
Warner Brothers Studio Tour

It’s been over two years since I moved to L.A.  I’d say I officially made it “in” the business in early 2014 when I landed a PA gig on my first real TV show.  I had had a lot of small (and unpaid) PA jobs prior to that, but never in major television.  It took me longer than some to get this coveted entry-level position, but certainly less time than others.

My boss always likes to say, “There’s more than one way to skin a cat.”  That saying definitely applies to getting into the entertainment business.  There are so many routes someone can take to get to the exact same spot, it’s impossible to cover all of them.  But for purposes of this article, I’m going to focus on a young person trying to get their first production assistant/entry-level job on a major film, TV show, or at a legitimate production company.

I surely did not know what I was doing when I first got here.  I naively thought that because being a production assistant is the lowest position on the totem pole, it’d be an easy job to snag.  I thought that because I was college educated and went to film school and worked on some short indie films back home, I’d be at an advantage in L.A.  I thought that because I knew a few people living and working in the city, I’d be fine.  Nope.  After my fluke one month stint as an apprentice editor, I learned the harsh realities of finding a job in Los Angeles.  I went into debt, got strung along at unpaid internships, and was weeks away from calling it quits and heading back home.

It was frustrating.  I was definitely qualified to be a production assistant.  It’s an entry-level position.  I knew I could be better than many, if not most, of the PAs already working on shows.  Why wasn’t this working out for me?  I spent over a year struggling to find steady work.  As I said in my first blog post, I was sleeping on air mattresses (plural, because they kept popping) for over a year before I could afford a real bed.

But last year, I finally got the phone call I was waiting for: “We’d love to have you on our team.  Can you start Monday?”  And that Monday I started working on a TV show at one of the major studios in Hollywood as a PA.  I got my foot in the door.

Looking back, I made a lot of mistakes.  I wasted so much time on things I shouldn’t have.  I missed opportunities that were staring me in the face.  I turned down a potentially great job because it wasn’t perfect!   But in the end, it all worked out.  I’m in the industry now.  I can’t say with 100% certainty I will be safely employed for the rest of my life.  But I feel confident that I have the know-how to keep afloat during the rough times. So now I’d like to extend my PA knowledge to you.  I want to help the newcomers flocking to Hollywood avoid the rookie mistakes I made.  My advice and my way are not the only routes to landing a job.  But I truly believe they will give you a tremendous head start in understanding how Hollywood works and understanding how you can put yourself in opportune situations to land the job.

Friends set


The way Hollywood works is not the same as how the rest of the world works.


Brutal, but true.  In most fields, your college education is a major contributing factor in securing a job.  Your training in school is supposed to give you the skills to competently work at a business right away. Sure, it’s not always that cut and dry, especially in today’s economy, but for the most part, it’s true.  In the entertainment industry, a college education doesn’t guarantee you to a job right away, or even a job at all.  Anyone, educated or not, can become a PA and work their way up to director, producer, editor, etc. Everyone has to start at the bottom.  Everyone has to prove their worth first.  Yes, there are exceptions, but your Director of Photography credit on that student film you made means nothing in Tinseltown.  You can’t expect to land a DP position on anything major when you first arrive here.  The credits just don’t transfer.  It’s like trying to apply to a prestigious art school and saying you were the best finger painter in kindergarten.  It doesn’t fly.

Don’t think having a formal education is completely worthless though.  It can still be a huge benefit in jumpstarting your career.  It’s just not a requirement 0r a guaranteed ticket in.


I used to hate this saying.  I’d argue, “But I’m a hard worker. Doesn’t that matter? Why should ‘who I know’ limit me?”  Sure, you can complain about how unfair it is or you can learn to play the game.  I actually like this saying now because it puts me in control.  Who I know helps get me jobs! I know that if I need to meet a certain person to get the job, it’s up to me to figure out how to meet them.

You don’t have to be friends with A-list actors and directors to get a job here.  The best way, I’ve found, is meeting a friend of a friend.  And everyone has a friend in the area you’re trying to get into.  Build enough relationships with these people, and show that you’re a hard worker, and eventually someone will pass your name along to someone who’s hiring.

Also, once you’re already in the business you’ll love that it’s “all about who you know.”  The people you work with become the people who hire/refer you for your next job.  How great is that?  You’re in total control of your success.  This way of doing things is much easier than sending in a resume blind and hoping for the best.


Sometimes getting the job is just about luck and timing.  Some people move to Hollywood and within a week they land an assistant position to a top television producer.  Are they the best person for the job? Not necessarily.  The person happened to move at the right time.  The producer happened to need an assistant at that time.  And their needs just happened to line up.  I’d say a big part of how I landed my network TV gig was luck and timing.  It may not be fair, but there’s a lot you can do to make sure those doors of opportunity are always open.




So I know I probably depressed you when I said having a college education doesn’t mean anything in this industry.  And that’s true from the standpoint of entitlement and working your way up.  But if you’re still in school, you do have a huge advantage.  You qualify to apply for internships – internships at major, LA-based companies.  Most of the good internships require you to currently be enrolled in school.  And there are a lot of great companies looking for interns! If it’s possible, I highly recommend moving out to LA for a summer (or a semester) and applying to as many internships as you can.  It’s expensive to live out here, but if you find the right internship, it can be absolutely worth it.  These internships have major advantages:

1.  They give you reputable L.A. experience, which is what you want on your resume.  Getting a “Video Intern” credit at your local library back home isn’t quite as impressive as say, “post-production intern” at a LA-based company.

2.  They give you direct contacts and future possibilities of employment in L.A.  If your employers like you, they’ll want to hire you   eventually.  If not, they can still help you find work elsewhere through their contacts.

Here’s an example of just how beneficial L.A. internships can be.  My friend Nick got a job right out of school.  We had very similar skill levels and educations.  The only real difference was that Nick had three solid L.A. internship credits on his resume.  I had one credit from Michigan when I was a media center video intern.  Nick’s internships were at a post house for music videos, a post house for commercials, and a small production company producing reality TV.  All three were well-known names in the industry.

 When Nick graduated, one of the companies offered him a position. And when applying for other jobs, he landed multiple interviews.  Months later, we were talking and I realized we applied for many of the same jobs.  How many interviews did I land? 0.  I didn’t even receive a followup email.  Nick was swimming in choices.

I know, other factors might have been at play.  For example, it could have been good timing and luck, as I mentioned earlier.  Or maybe Nick had a killer resume.  But I’m confident that when companies are looking for an entry-level candidate, and they see you’ve worked for recognizable, established companies, your resume is going to go to the top of the pile.

It’s no surprise that internships help get you a job, but in this business, it’s the L.A. internships that really do the trick.


Look up your favorite companies and see if they offer summer internships.  Also, don’t be afraid to use some of the more “generic” websites like Craigslist or Indeed to look for companies.  They post many opportunities.  Just make sure you always do your own research before taking any job.  If you’re looking for an entertainment-based website that posts internships, I’ve had success using

chinese theater


Hey, you can still get a job here too!  You may not have the connections or a killer resume yet, but you can get them pretty quickly.  Here’s what I suggest:


If you’re moving out to LA, give yourself a set amount of time you’ll look for industry work, before finding a part-time job. If you don’t find work in that amount of time, take a part-time job, in any industry! Why?  First, you’re giving yourself a set amount of time to focus on one thing and one thing only: landing an entertainment job.  Second, a set time will keep you hungry during the search.  You didn’t move out to LA to work at a grocery store, so you’ll be motivated to look harder as the days fly by.  Third, you need money. Duh.  And if you don’t find a job within your set amount of time, this keeps you from going into debt.  As an added bonus, you’ll meet coworkers who might be in or know people in the industry.  I made the mistake of looking for industry work, getting an unpaid internship (thinking it would turn into paid work) and going way too many months without an income.  In my mind, the paid work was always just around the corner, so there was no reason to get a temporary job at TJ’s.  Big mistake.  Get a job and start making money.  You can always quit when something better comes along.


You can find legitimate, full-time work and/or small gigs that will lead to the full-time work right on Craigslist.  Start by looking to fill up your weekends with PA work on small music videos and short films.  Someone is always trying to make the next Star Wars on a $1 budget.  There is a lot of crap out there, and it’s difficult to sort through it all, but I believe it’s worth the effort.  If you have a halfway decent resume and you can convince the job poster that you’re a hard-working and dependable individual, these jobs are pretty easy to snag.  The pay might be $50 a day, free lunch, or even nothing.  But these gigs can lead to real opportunities.  Many people will argue with me on this, but if you’re new to the industry or LA, working for free can still be beneficial.  You may be working for free, but that doesn’t mean everyone else on the crew is.  They may have connections and friends they can introduce you to.  Or they’ll want to hire you for the next job, which will be paid.  Craigslist is a great place to start filling up your resume and make connections quickly.  A craigslist gig is actually what led me to my network TV gig.

A quick note about working for free:  Only work for free if you’re learning something new and/0r it will help you advance.  If you’re not learning anything to help you grow in your field, find something else.


Make it a daily routine to go through each site, multiple times a day, looking for new jobs you can apply for.  Start here:


Some of the most popular job-hunting sites in the industry:

  • – This used to be my favorite.  An entertainment job website/network that posts new jobs each day.  Jobs range from PA to Producer and I’ve had good results with this website.
  • – You’ll hear about this one a lot.  New jobs are posted daily in a variety of crew positions.
  • – Mentioned earlier, it’s another well-known choice.


Follow your favorite companies and job sites.  Many times they will post ads on their social media pages making it easy for you to see new jobs right on your news feed.

Also look for closed groups you can join such as:

  • “I Need a Production Assistant” –  You’ll have to request to join, but once you’re in, you can connect directly with whoever is hiring.  Anyone can post a job, and since it’s a Facebook group, you can get a notification as soon as they post it.
  • “I Need a Producer” – This group also posts PA positions for some reason.

There are plenty of these types of groups on Facebook.  Spend some time looking through them.


This one can be tricky, because you have to find a way to get on the lists.  This is where knowing the right people can help.  Many schools have alumni email lists you can get on that send out regular job postings to a group of people.  People love helping out someone who went to their school.  First, find out if your school has an email list you can get on.  If not, find a friend who can get on one and have them forward you the emails.  Some may frown upon this, but remember, most job posters are sending out job opportunities via email in hopes that their network will bring in a good catch for them.  In other words, they expect their emails to be forwarded.  If not, they’ll say so.


Google “UTA Job list”.  It’s one of the most well-known entertainment industry job lists not available to the public.  Although a quick Google search will show you how easy it is to find. It mostly covers assistant and entry-level positions.


People love to give advice and help others.  Once you start meeting people in the industry, work on building your relationships with them and start asking them questions.  Consider even asking if you can shadow them for a day.  When I was on the hunt for PA work, I met an editor for coffee and asked him a list of questions about the business.  I told him that I eventually want to become an editor and I’m just trying to get my foot in the door.  He gave a lot of great advice: PA knowledge, how to move up, what to expect, etc.  After our meeting, he kept his ears open for me and forwarded any job opportunities he received.  We still keep in touch and he always knows 1. When I’m looking for work and 2. My ultimate goal of becoming an editor.  This is what you ideally want all of your connections to know.  If you have multiple contacts who know these two things about you, you’ll have your own personal job search team working while you sleep.

Also find forums and websites where you can ask general questions about the business.  For example, there are many online communities for active filmmakers and editors.

Here are a few communities you can learn from and reach out to:

Many people who are already established in the industry are active in these kinds of forums.  Spend some time finding ones that apply to you and ask for advice.

I also like  It’s not really a forum or community, but the author posts common questions and answers for people trying to get started in the business.  It’s always really solid advice.


If you already know people in the business, make sure you check in with them regularly and let them know you’re still looking for work.  For example, if you met someone who has connections during one of your weekend Craigslist gigs (and they liked you), follow up with him/her.  You don’t want to bother them, but you want them to keep your name in the back of their mind in case they hear of anything.  Don’t check in more than once every month or two, though.  This is a good strategy when your current gig is about to end too.


If you’re interested in working for a company that doesn’t currently have a job posting: cold call.  Go old school.  Find an entertainment biz directory online that lists all the entertainment companies in your area.  Print it out, and highlight all the companies you’re interested in.  Call them up, one by one.  Don’t email. Don’t make it easy for them to ignore you.  Say who you are, what you do, and ask if they have any PA positions available.  Be specific and confident in what you want.  If they say no, ask if there’s someone you can send your resume to for later use.  Again, if you can keep yourself in the back of their mind, when they are looking to hire, you’ll be one of the first people they think of.

This won’t work for every company.  For example, you can’t just call up Warner Brothers and ask for a job. They’ll just direct you to their career website.  However, for many smaller companies and production houses, they’ll be impressed by your boldness.  Some may be annoyed, but who cares. Most won’t. And you need a job! If you impress them on the phone and follow through with your resume, you’re making their hiring process easier, and increasing your chances.

Note: If a job posting says “Please No Calls,” you do not call!


Make friends.  Join meet up groups related to film (and not related).  Be nice to everyone.  Ask someone out to coffee.  Befriend everyone you meet. Do things you wouldn’t normally do to make connections in the business. Everyone is a connection out here. The best way to find a job is to find a friend who’s in the business or knows someone in the business.  The computer can only get you so far.  You’ve probably heard it too many times already: It’s all about who you know.  Networking is extremely important in any career field, but to land a job in the entertainment business, it’s probably the most important thing.  Also, unlike most jobs which last years, if not decades, most entertainment industry jobs last months.  You usually get hired for the duration of the show, film, or commercial, and once it ends, you’re looking for the next job.  That’s why networking is so critical.  If you don’t continue to build your network, you won’t have anyone to help you find a job when your gig ends.  Networking never stops.

When I first moved out here, I had a job as an apprentice editor.  Because I was new, and unsure how the industry worked, I didn’t go out of my way to connect with my coworkers.  I heard horror stories of people getting fired for saying the wrong thing to the editors.  I did my work well but I kept my head down.  I didn’t ask questions.  I didn’t get to know anyone.  When the gig ended, no one even knew I wanted to be an editor.  I just left without making any connections.  I was an idiot.  It was only a month-long gig, but I had plenty of time to plant the seed.  This was such a missed opportunity for me.  Remember when I said I want to be an editor?  This could have been a direct ticket in.


This not only helps you gain experience and build a network, but it’s also critical for you to be ready to go when an opportunity presents itself later in you career.  If you want to be famous director, you should be directing stuff now.  If you want to be an editor, you should be editing stuff now.  You may make your living by being a PA, but you should be crafting your skill, in where you want to be, by making your own stuff.  You never know when a great opportunity will come up.  Be ready.

Get a team together and make your own stuff.  People love to find a group they can regularly work with and rely on.  Plus it’s just smart.  If you need to find a team, consider joining a Meetup group like the LA Film Collective (active as of early 2015). They get together about once a month to shoot a short film.  Every crew position is open for you to gain experience.  There are a handful of Meetups like this one!

We live in a great time when making videos can be relatively cheap.    Good cameras and equipment are affordable.  We have sites like Youtube and Vimeo where you can promote yourself and gain a following.  Take advantage of it all.  The tradition way of moving up the ladder still exists, but so many alternate ways have opened up, too.  If you’re doing things on the side, you’re just increasing your chances for success.


Soon after I moved to LA, I landed an interview for a wedding videography company.  I wasn’t very happy about it though, because I didn’t really want to edit wedding videos.  After all, that’s not why I moved to LA.  Using this logic, I decided to not even go to the interview.  WTH, Randy!?  I guess I was worried I’d get stuck there and be in the wrong field for too long.  Never turn down an interview.  You never know what will happen.  Had I taken the interview and landed the job, I would not have gone thousands of dollars into debt, I probably would have learned a plethora of new editing skills, and who knows, maybe I’d have loved it. Things worked out eventually, but don’t be like me.  If you are offered an interview or job, don’t not take it just because it’s not perfect.   There are a thousand ways to skin a cat, remember?  You can still get to where you want to go even if you start somewhere else.



Even though I said it’s all about who know, resumes are still used in this industry.  It’s important that your resume is top-notch.  I’m always amazed at what my bosses remember about me, months later, from reading my resume.

“Oh you worked on that ABC show right?”

“Hey, honor student, get me some coffee!”

Screw all the resume advice you hear from so-called experts.  The entertainment business is different.  Get rid of that pointless objective.  Margin size doesn’t matter.  Times New Roman font is just fine.  Don’t write that you work well with others.  You’re a functioning member of society.  You better work well with others!

Here’s what’s important:

  • Your resume should tell the reader exactly who you are at first glance.  Don’t make them search.  Get rid of unnecessary detail.  A list of your credits and few personal details is a good resume in this business.
  • List your job title.  You don’t need to describe your duties unless it’s something unique.  Those who hire a PA know what a PA does.
  • List the show name, production company, and the network or type of media it was.  Location and date are optional, especially if you have time gaps and no L.A. experience on your resume.  But neither is a resume killer.
  • If you are applying for a PA position DO NOT say you were a DP, director, or producer, on a student film.  Drop that stuff.  The L.A. film industry does not care.
  • Film degree? Graduated with honors?  Sure, keep it on there! People like to see you’re serious about the industry and know at least something.
  • If you want to list your skills/attributes, keep it short and pertaining to the job you’re applying for.  Heavy phone experience, going on runs, reliable car, personal laptop, and script or binder organization are a few good ones. Show them you already know what they’re looking for.
  • Tailor your resume to the job you’re applying for.  Do not just have one generic resume.
  • Are you from the Midwest? You’re in luck. The stereotype in L.A. is that people from the Midwest are hard working and dependable. They like us here. Fit that info on your resume somewhere ;).  Kidding. Kind of.  But I did land my first major PA gig this way.


If you are lazy or incompetent you will leave this business as fast as you got in.  Show your superiors you want to be there.  Impress them.  Make them happy they hired you.  This is what keeps you employed.  Hollywood is small and word travels fast.  Don’t give anyone a reason to not like you.

There is no single, clear-cut way to break into the industry.  However, I do believe that if you follow the advice given above, you’ll get in much faster – or at the very least, you’ll avoid my stupid mistakes.


If you have any questions, please go ahead and ask in the comments below.  Or connect with me on social media:


Check out the ebook on Amazon, here:

How to Become a Production Assistant in Hollywood: Actionable Steps and Advice to Land the Job


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